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Manabu Sakamoto

       
      Postal address: Dept. of Earth Sciences
      University of Bristol
      Wills Memorial Building
      Queen's Road
      BRISTOL BS8 1RJ
      Office: L 121
      E mail address: M.Sakamoto@bristol.ac.uk
      Telephone: +44 (0)117 3315181
      Fax: +44 (0)117 9253385

Thesis title:
Bite force and the evolution of feeding function in birds, dinosaurs and cats

Names of thesis advisors:
Prof. M.J. Benton

Start and finish dates:
1 Oct 2004 - 30 Sept 2008


Recent Publications:

Scientific Papers:
[1]Lloyd, G. T., Davis, K. E., Pisani, D., Tarver, J. E., Ruta, M., Sakamoto, M., Hone, D. W. E., Jennings, R. and Benton, M. J., 2008. Dinosaurs and the Cretaceous Terrestrial Revolution. Proc. Roy. Soc. B, 275: 2483-2490.
[2] Fukuda, R.-I., Hayashi, A., Utsunomiya, A., Nukada, Y., Fukui, R., Itoh, K., Tezuka, K., Ohashi, K., Mizuno, K., Sakamoto, M., Hamanoue, M., and Tsuji., T. 2005. Alteration of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase cascade in the multilobulated nuclear formation of adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). PNAS 102: 15213-15218.
Abstracts:
[1] Sakamoto, M. 2006. Bite force estimates as ecological indicators in theropod communities. p. 176. in Paul M. Barrett and Susan E. Evans (eds.), Ninth international symposium on Mesozoic terrestrial ecosystems and biota, Manchester, UK. Cambridge Publications. Natural History Museum, London, UK. 187 pp.
[2] Sakamoto, M. 2006. Scaling bite force in predatory animals: how does T. rex compare to modern predators? J. Vert. Paleontol. 56: 118A-118A.
[3] Sakamoto, M. 2006. Scaling bite force in predatory animals: how does T. rex compare to modern predators? The Palaeontological Association Newsletter 63: 69-69
[4] Sakamoto, M. 2007. Scaling bite forces in predatory animals: bite force is proportional to body mass^2/3. p. 22 in Graeme T. Lloyd (eds.) Progressive Palaeontology 2007, Department of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol. 38 pp.
[5] Sakamoto, M. 2007. Scaling bite forces in predatory animals: bite force is proportional to body mass^2/3. p. 108. 8th International Congress of Vertebrate Morphology. 172 pp.
[6] Sakamoto, M. 2007. Scaling bite forces in predatory animals: bite force is proportional to body mass^2/3. J. Vert. Paleontol.27: 138A-138A.
[7] Sakamoto, M. 2007. Tracing the evolution of bite force in finches and carnivores. The Palaeontological Association Newsletter 66: 53-53
Others:
[1] Momohara, A. 2000. Sudden global warming and sea level change in Holocen Japan. in Akiko Domoto, Kunio Iwatsuki, Takeo Kawamichi and Jeffrey McNeely (eds), A threat to life: the impact of climate change on Japan's biodiversity. Tsukiji-Shokan Publishing Co., Ltd., Japan. Pp. 38-41 (162 pages) - English translator of Japanese manuscript
Popular articles:
[1] Feathered Dinosaurs. in pen: with new attitude No. 221, 15 May 2008 issue, p. 45, interviewer, (in Japanese)


Further Information:

Research interests:
Phylogeny and biomechanics in theropod dinosaurs
My website:
Raptor's Nest - this is my personal website where I keep my attempts at illustrations of theropods
Raptor's Nest
My blog:
Raptor's Nest Blog - this is my personal blog where I introduce and discuss scientific papers
Online resources:
DinoBase - online encyclopedia of dinosaurs with forum for discussions and questions (I am the administrator)
Ask a Biologist - a forum primarily for school kids to ask questions about biology (I am a moderator)


Return to:
Department of Earth Sciences home page: http://www.gly.bris.ac.uk/
Research group home page: http://palaeo.gly.bris.ac.uk/

This page was last updated on 12 May 2008